Holidays

Happy Resurrection Holiday

dying resurrected godThis is a repost from 2010.  You might also enjoy my podcast

I have always found it interesting that the timing Christian holiday of Easter is based on the lunar cycle and the Spring Equinox.  The holiday that the Christian world celebrates as Easter retains much of its pagan roots as a fertility festival and a time of balance as the days and nights (in the northern hemispheres) are of equal length. Even the name “Easter” is taken from the Saxon fertility goddess Ostara or Eostre, who is related to Astarte in ancient Babylon and Ashtoreth in ancient Israel.  And the Easter bunny is, of course, an old pagan symbol of fertility.

The resurrection story of Jesus is virtually identical to the tale of the resurrection of the Phrygian god Attis who preceded him:  According to Gerald Berry’s Religions of the World: The Record of Man’s Religious Faiths Primitive rites, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, Christianity and others, written in 1965, “About 200 B.C. mystery cults began to appear in Rome just as they had earlier in Greece. Most notable was the Cybele cult centered on Vatican hill …Associated with the Cybele cult was that of her lover, Attis (the older Tammuz, Osiris, Dionysus, or Orpheus under a new name). He was a god of ever-reviving vegetation. Born of a virgin, he died and was reborn annually. The festival began as a day of blood on Black Friday and culminated after three days in a day of rejoicing over the resurrection.”

Another interesting aspect to the timing of Easter is its combination of the solar and lunar calendar, taking place as it does on the first Sunday following the 14th day of the lunar month following the Equinox.  The […]

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By |2014-04-20T18:52:59-04:00April 20th, 2014|Holidays|1 Comment

The Esoteric Easter

Most of us know these days that Easter has its roots in Paganism.  Why else is it tied to the Full Moon?  Here is a repost from 2007 you might enjoy.

“Easter Morning” by James B. Janknegt

While you’re all nibbling on chocolate bunnies and hunting for easter eggs, I thought you might enjoy another take on this multidimensional holiday from by G. de Purucker, Gnostic scholar:

Easter is a beautiful season of the year. It is not merely a day, it is rather a spiritual idea; indeed, it is an ideal — as it were a breath of the soul of antiquity, which has come down to us, albeit distorted, from far past ages, this soul-breathing of antiquity arising in the inner spiritual life of man. By these words I mean that Easter represents an actual event which occurs annually in the spiritual life of man, because the events of man’s spiritual life faithfully reflect the events that take place in the spiritual life of the world.

It is a fact, Brothers, that every great mystical event of the ancient religions and philosophies of the world was commemorated in a feast, in the ancient sense of this word — in a festival such as Easter in Occidental lands now is, and such as was the European original and forerunner of the present-day Easter festival: the Ostara or Eastre, as it was called by different families of the early Germanic inhabitants of the northern European countries. In those lands it took the form of a celebration of the vital forces working in the springtime, when new life is surging through the earth and affecting all earth’s children, when the trees begin to burgeon and the flowers begin to blow, and when a new hope […]

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By |2018-11-19T21:25:06-04:00April 17th, 2014|Holidays|1 Comment

Astrotheology: The Sun of God

astrotheology christmas
The fact that our Judeo-Christian mythos is a derivation of earlier religions and legends has moved into the mainstream, and the idea that the divinity of Jesus has parallels with other gods is no longer a shocking idea.  Most of us realize now that Jesus wasn’t born on Christmas day – shepherds don’t watch their flocks in December, even in ancient Judea – and that the Christmas holiday was adopted because it was already being celebrated as the Winter Solstice in the pagan world.

The Winter Solstice is celebrated as the time when the dying god (the Sun) is resurrected again – the Sun is reborn and the days begin to lengthen.  From the book :

# The sun “dies” for three days at the winter solstice, to be born again on December 25th.

# The Sun of God is “born of a virgin,” which refers to both the new or “virgin” moon and the constellation of Virgo.

# The Sun’s “birth” is attended by the “bright star,” either Sirius/Sothis or the planet Venus, and by the “Three Kings,” representing the three stars in the belt of Orion.

# The sun at its’ zenith, or 12 noon, is in the house or heavenly temple of the “Most High;” thus, “he” begins “his father’s work” at “age” 12. Jordan Maxwell relates, “At that point, all Egypt offered prayers to the “Most High God.”

# The Sun enters into each zodiac sign at 30 degrees; hence, the “Sun of God” begins his ministry at “age” 30. The Sun of the visible heavens has moved northward 30 degrees and stands at the gate of Aquarius, the water-bearer, or John the Baptist of the mystic planisphere, and here begins his work of […]

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By |2016-12-25T07:28:50-04:00December 24th, 2013|Holidays, Religion|7 Comments

Venus turns retrograde at the Winter Solstice

photo from NASA

The Solstice occurs today (Winter for us northern hemispherians, Summer for the Aussies and Kiwis) – a time when the days are shortest in the north and longest in the south as the wheel of the year turns and takes us from light to darkness, and back to light again.

The Solstice Sun is locked in a square to Mars, energizing the seasonal shift and requiring that some level of action occur.  Over the past five years or so, ever since Pluto entered Capricorn, the Solstice and Equinox Sun has been involved in challenging aspects to either Uranus or Pluto, and sometimes both which imbued the charts of these events with intensity and fervor.  With Uranus and Pluto moving forward (currently they are at 8-10 degrees) the Sun is free of that influence and that should settle down some of the planetary energy, at least until next spring when Mars locks into Uranus and Pluto and creates some havoc.

Venus only turns retrograde every eighteen months or so, and while it is a relatively benign event it can have an important effect on our relationships. The retrograde motion of any planet causes us to tend to look backwards, so Venus retrograde periods often brings opportunities to revisit people from the past and incorporate them into our current lives in new ways.  Venus will be retrograde between December 21 and January 31, 2014.

Relationships that begin when Venus is retrograde may not last, but they can have a strong healing effect as they take us into influences from our past and open up a part of ourselves that has hitherto been unknown to us.  Venus is in Capricorn where we become more responsible to […]

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By |2013-12-21T08:29:43-04:00December 21st, 2013|Holidays|0 Comments

Happy Eostre!

reprinted from 2006.  Artwork by

Many people will celebrate Easter Sunday as the day that Christ rose from his grave and achieved godhood. In ancient mythology, the archetype of the dying and rising god actually began thousands of years before Jesus with the stories of Osiris and Tammuz, Adonis and Attis — all legends of gods that suffered an untimely end but were reborn into physical existence in order to spread their religion. Festivals celebrating the death of the god in winter when the crops were dying and the resurrection in spring were common.

Long before the birth of Jesus, Dionysus was resurrected and ascended to heaven after being torn apart by the Titans, an event celebrated in mystery cults in early Rome. Belief in Dionysus was thought to give one eternal life, and followers were initiated by bathing.

Several hundred years before Jesus, stories about the Anatolian god Attis claimed that he was born to a Virgin and was considered both the Father and the divine son. The Festival of Joy was celebrated every year in Rome: the first day commemorated his death, and on the third day the worshippers celebrated his rising from the dead.

Mithras was a Persian god who had faded into prehistory until being imported into Rome around 70 BC according to Plutarch. Mithras was born on December 25 of a virgin mother. He was born into a mortal body in order to redeem humanity and was known as Savior.

According to the 8th century Christian monk and historian Bede, first asserted in his book De Ratione Temporum that Easter was named after Eostre (a.k.a. Eastre). Eostre was a Teutonic goddess of fertility, who was often portrayed in Anglo-Saxon myth with a white hare standing in attendance. The hare, or rabbit, […]

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By |2019-04-14T07:30:35-04:00March 31st, 2013|Holidays|6 Comments
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