Holidays

Happy Eostre!

reprinted from 2006.  Artwork by Paulina Stuckey-Cassidy

Many people will celebrate Easter Sunday as the day that Christ rose from his grave and achieved godhood. In ancient mythology, the archetype of the dying and rising god actually began thousands of years before Jesus with the stories of Osiris and Tammuz, Adonis and Attis — all legends of gods that suffered an untimely end but were reborn into physical existence in order to spread their religion. Festivals celebrating the death of the god in winter when the crops were dying and the resurrection in spring were common.

Long before the birth of Jesus, Dionysus was resurrected and ascended to heaven after being torn apart by the Titans, an event celebrated in mystery cults in early Rome. Belief in Dionysus was thought to give one eternal life, and followers were initiated by bathing.

Several hundred years before Jesus, stories about the Anatolian god Attis claimed that he was born to a Virgin and was considered both the Father and the divine son. The Festival of Joy was celebrated every year in Rome: the first day commemorated his death, and on the third day the worshippers celebrated his rising from the dead.

Mithras was a Persian god who had faded into prehistory until being imported into Rome around 70 BC according to Plutarch. Mithras was born on December 25 of a virgin mother. He was born into a mortal body in order to redeem humanity and was known as Savior.

According to the 8th century Christian monk and historian Bede, first asserted in his book De Ratione Temporum that Easter was named after Eostre (a.k.a. Eastre). Eostre was a Teutonic goddess of fertility, who was often portrayed in Anglo-Saxon myth with a white hare standing in attendance. The hare, or rabbit, […]

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By |2019-08-27T10:35:17-04:00March 31st, 2013|Holidays|6 Comments

Happy Thanksgiving to you, and Blogiversary to me!

Astrological MusingsIt was Thanksgiving of 2005 when this blog began.  My sister, already a prolific blogger, helped me get Astrological Musings set up on Blogger, and the rest is history.  At the time there were just a handful of astrology blogs: Elsa, of course, and Robert, and Jeff’s blog at the time was “Astrology at the Movies.”   Things have changed – currently there are 187 members of our Astrology Bloggers Facebook group.

My second Saturn Return began last fall with a burst of productivity, but the second phase in the spring was marked by a blog crisis of major proportions as Astrological Musings quit BeliefNet to move to Patheos, only to be dropped by Patheos under threat of a lawsuit from BeliefNet.  Who knew Astrological Musings was so valuable!

The Saturn Return wasn’t all I went through this summer and fall – the Uranus/Pluto square fell right on Chiron in my natal chart, opening up old wounds and unearthing layers of emotional sensitivity that were ripe for the healing process.  During this period my mother nearly died, an incredibly intense experience that took me literally into the realm of Pluto and clearing some of the karmic garbage between my mother and myself.

I have a lot to be grateful for this Thanksgiving.  I am grateful that many of the readers who started this blog with me back in the early days are still with me.  I am grateful for the healing that has taken place with my mother and my sister, even though it was painful and disturbing at times.  I am grateful for the love and support of my husband […]

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By |2012-11-22T09:37:58-04:00November 22nd, 2012|Astrology in my world, Holidays, Saturn Return|12 Comments

The astrological Samhain

Samhain astrology Samhain by Phantom’s Siren

Until the rise of the neo-Pagan phenomenon of the mid to late twentieth century, I think it’s safe to say that most Americans had never heard of Samhain (pronounced Sow’-en), the ancient Celtic autumn festival.  It is likely that our modern celebration of Hallowe’en developed to take the place of the ancient festival.  The Christian All Hallows festival to honor the souls of the saints that had passed on was originally celebrated in May but was moved to November 1st in 835 by Pope Gregory IV.

In any case, the Samhain festival celebrates the dead and it is said that the veil between the worlds is at its thinnest at this time, making it easier to communicate with those on the other side.  Feasts were held in which the dead were invited to participate, and in later times costumes were worn to protect against malicious spirits.

Samhain is one of the “cross-quarter” holidays that fall between the Solstices and Equinoxes.  Astrologically, the Solstices and Equinoxes mark the entry of the Sun into the cardinal signs of initiation: Aries at Spring, Cancer at Summer, Libra at Autumn and Capricorn at Winter.  The cross-quarter periods occur at 15 degrees of the fixed signs, with Samhain in the sign of Scorpio, the sign that corresponds to death and rebirth.

Technically, Samhain this year occurs on November 6th when the Sun reaches 15 degrees Scorpio. In the northern hemisphere there is a sense that darkness is descending and we begin retreating to the shelter of our homes where the pathwork of the inner life can take place.


 

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By |2018-11-08T07:02:53-04:00November 1st, 2012|Holidays|2 Comments

Chart for the Summer Solstice, 2012

by lokasiwisata.info

image by Visual Alchemy.  The Summer Solstice (northern hemisphere) occurs in the tropical zodiac at the exact moment when the Sun enters the sign of Cancer.  This coincides with the longest day of the year and the most fertile season in agrarian cultures in the northern hemisphere.  (Of course for my Aussie and Kiwi friends as well as those in southern Africa the seasons are reversed and the Summer Solstice occurs in December with the entry of the Sun into Capricorn.  If you’re curious about astrology in the southern hemisphere, check out this article.)

Cancer is the sign of nurturing and is ruled by the Moon, yet at the Summer Solstice the Sun is at its peak in its rulership of the sky.  Even when the Sun is at its most strong, its brilliant rays need to be filtered through the lunar light of emotion and instinct, symbolizing the need for the uniting of male and female energies in order for each to truly be expressed.

This Summer Solstice follows a New Moon in which the energies of the Sun and Moon are fused in a fresh new evolutionary cycle, and the New Moon was in Gemini, the sign of duality.  Are you sensing a theme here?  Dark and light, good and evil, Sun and Moon – balance and integration is the key.

That will not be easy during this Solstice season with Uranus nearing its first exact “square” alignment to Pluto.  This is a planetary cycle of change and transformation during which very little will be left unchanged.  We are birthing new paradigms now – any cultural dynamics that no longer serve the modern world will crumble and fall away.  This will lead to much fear and hysteria, but to […]

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By |2018-06-11T11:09:00-04:00June 20th, 2012|Holidays|3 Comments

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

I am a bit of a grinch about St. Patrick’s day because of the symbolism of the chasing of the snakes and serpents (natural wisdom) out of Ireland.  But I do love Ireland and today I will be at a pub playing Irish music, wearing green. So I thought I would share something about ancient Irish astrology as it might have been practiced by the Druids.  Unfortunately very little of their wisdom and practice comes down to us in any kind of authenticated form, but this article sheds a light on ancient Irish astronomy and astrology:

Greek and Latin writers show clearly that the Celts were not only advanced in astronomy but that they were respected, especially by the Greeks, for their ‘speculations from the stars’. Even the Romans, from Caesar to Pliny, paid tribute to their astronomy. One of the first to note that the ancient Celts believed the world to be round (not flat) was Martial (c. AD 40-103/4) who, himself, claimed Celtic ancestry. The famous 1st Century BC Coligny Calendar, once thought to be the most extensive document in a Celtic language but now surpassed by other fascinating discoveries, has been dated to its original computation, by its astronomical observations and calculations. This highly sophisticated lunar and solar predictor was, according to the leading Celtic scholar, Dr Garrett Olmsted, first constructed in 1100 BC. [2] It is important to note that the concepts of the calendar find parallels in Vedic cosmology. We will return to this later. It was the Greek Hippolytus (AD 170-236), using an earlier source, who stated that the ancient Celts foretold the future from the stars by ciphers and numbers after the manner of the Pythagoreans. Space precludes a discussion on the argument which took place among the […]

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By |2012-03-17T05:52:02-04:00March 17th, 2012|Astrology, Holidays|0 Comments
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